Monday, 31 July 2017

UK Tour 2017 Part 2




After a relatively quiet week or so, during which I have continued to help my parents with some of the heavy tasks they aren’t as keen to do nowadays, in particular - emptying the compost bin, cleaning conservatory roof and turning mattresses, I have also been preparing for the Festival of Quilts at the NEC Birmingham which is coming up soon. I suspect that the pieces I am making as a part of a personal take on Tapa Cloth, will not be complete – their full development will have to be held back for later. I would rather do this than rush pieces which are not fully realised and though I have been intermittently working on them for months, they have only just begun to feel as though I am on a wavelength with them. Sometimes this is the way it goes.

Tapa cloth experiments

Tapa Cloth experiments


Interspersed have been groups of you willing to think, work and play with a little encouragement from me.

Pattern and print development on 18th July was a quick dip into a method for making personal print blocks and a background for stitch based on Architectural patterns.

Pattern and Print Development with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden


Pattern and Print Development with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden


Pattern and Print Development with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden
Today we did 'Angelina meets Hundertwasser', using non-fusible Angelina fibres and inspired by the lovely organic forms of the artist Hundertwasser to create lush, rich complex surfaces.

Angelina meets Hundertwasser with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Angelina meets Hundertwasser with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Angelina meets Hundertwasser with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Angelina meets Hundertwasser with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Angelina meets Hundertwasser with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Angelina meets Hundertwasser with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Angelina meets Hundertwasser with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden


When we can manage to take a longer, deeper look into a subject, it is a rewarding experience all round. Thank you to those who came to Art Van Go for a 3 day version of Deconstruct: Reconstruct. Time spent closely examining the shape and form of seeds, and developing into sculptural, structural artworks using metal based techiniques paid off handsomely.

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden
Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

Deconstruct:Reconstruct with Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

East Surrey EG were kind enough to ask me to speak at their biannual textile day. Mini workshops, traders and home cooked lunch. Spoiled only by them having to listen to me afterwards (I hope I am joking)!!

Many, many thanks to those of you I have met on these days, and the images are more or less a random selection of your work, sorry if yours was not included here. If you have images of work you later finish, please send them as I will be very pleased to see them and post them for you. 
We caught the final day of the Weeping Window installation at the Derby Silk Mill, and as the artist and many of the assistants were from Derby and I know some of them I was particularly keen to see it.
Rather than describe it myself, here is the official wording:
The presentations by 14-18 NOW, the UK’s arts programme for the First World War centenary, will give people across the UK the chance to experience the impact of the ceramic poppy sculptures in a range of places of particular First World War resonance. During the First World War, Derby Silk Mill was divided into two businesses one grinding corn and the other making medical supplies, both integral to the British war effort and scarce by 1916.
Derby as a whole played a vital part in production during the course of the First World War with Rolls-Royce developing the Eagle Engine at the request of the government to power allied aircraft. As Derby Silk Mill: Museum of Making the museum now holds a great number of industrial and social history objects which help to tell the stories of Derby’s companies and its communities.
Wave and Weeping Window are from the installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red – poppies and original concept by artist Paul Cummins and installation designed by Tom Piper – by Paul Cummins Ceramics Limited in conjunction with Historic Royal Palaces. The installation was originally at HM Tower of London from August to November 2014 where 888,246 poppies were displayed, one to honour every death in the British and Colonial forces of the First World War.

 
Weeping Window by Paul Cummins


Weeping Window by Paul Cummins

Weeping Window by Paul Cummins


The second exhibition continues to the 22 October, so perhaps some of you will get a chance. 'House Style' is at Chatsworth House, Derbysire, UK.  I visited in the expectation of a couple of rooms of costumes, and a walk around the house and gardens. However, hats off to the curators and technical staff at Chatsworth. We were engrossed for over four hours on a winding tour around the house. Costumes had been displayed in different ways, contrasting occasions, times, styles and techniques. Giving both a fascinating insight into the public and private lives of the aristocracy who are associated with the House and a chance to see in vivid detail a huge selection of artefacts and background information. 

House Style at Chatsworth House

House Style at Chatsworth House

House Style at Chatsworth House

House Style at Chatsworth House

House Style at Chatsworth House

House Style at Chatsworth House

House Style at Chatsworth House

House Style at Chatsworth House with Mum and Dad playing dress up

Chatsworth House


One costume from a 'fancy dress party' which interested me was this one:

House Style at Chatsworth House
Detail of dress

Though the image is dark, the dress shows the use of metal foils in the embroidery. The only other example I have is a French, probably 18th C sleeve. I would like to find out more!


One question which has been raised several times recently has been: Why do you do it? Why return to the UK each year? What do you get out of it? The reply is simple – years of working with fabulous groups, meeting such characters and enjoying the company of like minded artists is not to be passed over lightly, or to be relinquished unless forced to. And with modern travel being so easy, why not? Additionally, not to be sniffed at, there is always time for socializing and catch ups. I have had conversations ranging from heart felt to hilarious with both old and new friends. Thank you for your time everyone.


Weather in the UK continues to be mixed as the Gulf Stream is further south than usual. In practical terms, that is lots of rain, a few storms and a glimpse of sun now and again! Not a great deal of call for shorts or sun cream as I set off to do some filming on Anglesey tomorrow. Not sure whether to look forward to that or not.




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